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Dr Sharmila Sur

Dr Sharmila Sur
Name Sharmila Sur
Position Research Fellow (Climate Prediction)
Section Centre for Applied Climate Sciences (Research)
Location Toowoomba Campus
Email
Qualifications PhD Savitribai Phule Pune
Languages Bengali (accredited translator)
Hindi (non accredited translator)
Homepage https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sharmila_S
The views expressed on staff homepages may not reflect the views of the University.

Sharmila Sur is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Climate Sciences, University of Southern Queensland (USQ), currently based at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne to work in close collaboration with seasonal prediction team as a part of the Northern Australia Climate Program (NACP). Sharmila is involved in understanding and predicting multiyear-to-decadal climate variability over Northern Australia, including the causes and predictability of multiyear wet/dry conditions using observations and ocean-atmosphere coupled ACCESS-S2. Her other research expertise includes understanding monsoon dynamics, simulation and prediction of sub-seasonal variability, tropical cyclones in a changing climate, and assessment of state-of-the-art climate models. Prior joining USQ, Sharmila was a Post-Doctoral researcher at the School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne. She also worked as a Research Fellow at the Indian Institute of Meteorology (IITM, Pune) and received her Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Space Science from University of Pune, India in 2015.


Research interests
• Tropical Climate Variability: Dynamics, Simulation & Prediction
• Extreme Weather-Climate Variability & Climate Change
• South Asian Monsoon Variability
• Tropical-Extratropical Interaction
• Climate Modelling and Evaluation

USQ Research affiliations

  • International Centre for Applied Climate Sciences (ICACS)

Research most recent
Sharmila S, Walsh K (2018): Recent poleward shift of tropical cyclone formation linked to Hadley cell expansion. Nature Climate Change, online July 2018, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0227-5.

Sharmila S, and Walsh K (2017): Impact of large-scale dynamical versus thermodynamical climate conditions on contrasting tropical cyclone genesis frequency. Journal of Climate, 30(22), 8865-8883 https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0900.1.

Sahai AK, Sharmila S, Chattopadhyay R et al. (2017): Potential predictability of wet/dry spells transitions during extreme monsoon years: An optimism for dynamical prediction. Natural Hazards, 1-12, doi:10.1007/s11069-017-2895-2


Research most notable
Sharmila S., Walsh K.J.E. (2018) Recent poleward shift of tropical cyclone formation linked to Hadley cell expansion. Nature Climate Change. July 2018. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-018-0227-5


Publications in ePrints

Sur, Sharmila and Hendon, Harry H. (2020) Mechanisms of multiyear variations of Northern Australia wet-season rainfall. Scientific Reports, 10 (1):5086.

Sur, Sharmila and Walsh, K. J. E. and Thatcher, M. and Wales, S. and Utembe, S. (2020) Real world and tropical cyclone world. Part I: high-resolution climate model verification. Journal of Climate, 33 (4). pp. 1455-1472. ISSN 0894-8755

Walsh, K. J. E. and Sur, Sharmila and Thatcher, M. and Wales, S. and Utembe, S. and Vaughan, A. (2020) Real world and tropical cyclone world. Part II: sensitivity of tropical cyclone formation to uniform and meridionally varying sea surface temperatures under aquaplanet conditions. Journal of Climate, 33 (4). pp. 1473-1486. ISSN 0894-8755

Sur, Sharmila and Walsh, K. J. E. (2018) Recent poleward shift of tropical cyclone formation linked to Hadley cell expansion. Nature Climate Change, 8 (8). pp. 730-736. ISSN 1758-678X

Sur, Sharmila and Walsh, K. J. E. (2017) Impact of large-scale dynamic versus thermodynamic climate conditions on contrasting tropical cyclone genesis frequency. Journal of Climate, 30 (22). pp. 8865-8883. ISSN 0894-8755