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Dr Jennifer Donovan

Dr Jennifer Donovan
Name Jennifer Donovan
Position Lecturer (Education)
Section School of Education
Office G317
Location Toowoomba Campus
Phone +61 7 4631 2837
Extension 2837
Email
Qualifications BSc UWA , GCertEd Edith Cowan , PhD UWA

Fields of Research (FoR)

  • Education systems not elsewhere classified ( 130199 )
  • Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified ( 130299 )
  • Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified ( 130399 )

Research interests
Influence of the mass media on students' academic knowledge, genetics teaching, introducing the big ideas of science such as atomic theory into primary school, academic persistence, argumentation

Professional memberships
Member of the Australasian Society for Human Biology (ASHB)
Member of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (ASERA)

Currently teaching courses/programs
EDX2260 Teaching Science Understanding
EDX3160 Science Curriculum and Pedagogy
EDC2300 Assessment and Reporting
EDU8602 Advanced Studies in Specialization

Teaching experience(Tertiary)
18 Years

Teaching experience(Other)
18 Years

Administrative responsibilities
Member of the BELA Faculty Board at USQ
Member of the Accessibility Network at USQ
Member of the Ally Network at USQ
Previous Chair of Human Biology and Biology Syllabus Committees in WA
Coordinator for multiple science education units at Edith Cowan University
Curriculum Officer at WA Curriculum Council 1999-2001

Research most recent
Donovan, J., & Haeusler, C. (2015). Developing scientific literacy: Introducing primary aged children to atomic-molecular theory. In E. de Silva, Cases on research-based teaching methods in science education. Hershey, Pa: IGI Global.

Donovan, J. & Venville, G. (2014). Blood and bones: the influence of the mass media on Australian primary school children’s understandings of genes and DNA. Science & Education (first published online 23 June 2012, doi: 10.1007/s11191-012-9491-3

Donovan, J., & Venville, G. (2012). Exploring the influence of the mass media on primary students’ conceptual understanding of genetics. Education 3-13, 40(1), 75-95.


Research most notable
Donovan, J., & Haeusler, C. (2015). Developing scientific literacy: Introducing primary aged children to atomic-molecular theory. In E. de Silva, Cases on research-based teaching methods in science education. Hershey, Pa: IGI Global.

Donovan, J. & Venville, G. (2014). Blood and bones: the influence of the mass media on Australian primary school children’s understandings of genes and DNA. Science & Education (first published online 23 June 2012, doi: 10.1007/s11191-012-9491-3

Venville, G., & Donovan, J. (2008). How pupils use a model for abstract concepts in genetics. Journal of Biological Education, 43(1), 6-14.


Publications in ePrints

Haeusler, Carole and Donovan, Jennifer (2017) Challenging the science curriculum paradigm: teaching primary children atomic-molecular theory. Research in Science Education. ISSN 0157-244X

Trimmer, Karen and Donovan, Jennifer and Findlay, Yvonne S. and Mohamed, Kamariah (2017) Master teachers as leaders in school-based action research. Leading and Managing, 23 (2). pp. 1-12. ISSN 1329-4539

Spence, Karen and Donovan, Jennifer and Danaher, P. A.ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2289-7774 (2016) Online professional development for Australian science teachers: developing and deploying a curriculum evaluation model. In: Teaching science online: practical guidance for effective instruction and lab work. Online Learning and Distance education. Stylus Publishing, Sterling, Virginia, United States, pp. 210-222. ISBN 978-1-62036-1887

Donovan, Jennifer and Haeusler, Carole (2015) Developing scientific literacy: introducing primary aged children to atomic-molecular theory. In: Cases on research-based teaching methods in science education. Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design. IGI Publishing (IGI Global), Hershey, PA. United States, pp. 30-63. ISBN 9781466663756

Donovan, Jennifer (2015) Margins for error: a discussion of barriers preventing the connection of mainstream and margins when conducting in-school research. In: Mainstreams, margins and the spaces in-between: new possibilities for education research. Routledge Research in Education. Taylor & Francis (Routledge), Abingdon, Oxford, pp. 223-238. ISBN 978-1-138-02138-9

View full listing in ePrints